The iPriest

The Church-Family-of-God in Africa prepares for the second session of the Synod on Synodality (an online African palaver on the future of …

Le 38e Festival Innu Nikamu a célébré la résilience autochtone à travers la musique. Des artistes variés ont partagé des messages d’espoir et de résistance. Performances envoûtantes et collaborations inspirantes ont souligné l'unité face à l'oppression. Ce festival a démontré que même en cage, l'oiseau continue de chanter.

The Igwe of Ikpamodo leads a community effort in Enugu-Ezike to combat food insecurity through agricultural revival. The initiative aims to restore …

Uda women lead an agricultural revival initiative in Enugu-Ezike, transforming insecurity into community development through sustainable farming practices.

Explore the rich history and evolution of Igbo alphabets, from Lepsius' pioneering work to modern refinements, showcasing dynamic linguistic adaptation and cultural heritage

Great farmers make great nations There is a famous saying that great farmers make great nations, but that does not change the …

Introduction: The Controversy Surrounding Ebuka Obi I have listened carefully to the debate surrounding Evangelist Ebuka Obi. After weighing the arguments, it’s …

Joyeuses Pâques à vous tous ! Le Christ est ressuscité ! Il est vraiment ressuscité. Désormais, il est vivant, car la mort …

Enugu-Ezike is a town in southeastern Nigeria, boasting a rich cultural heritage. However, in recent years, there have been significant changes in …

I had the honour of officiating at the baptism of two children in Kitigan Zibi last Sunday. It got me thinking about …

Une chance pour un catholicisme autochtone au Québec, c’est le sentiment d’une centaine des personnes, autochtones et allochtones, qui rassemblent au sous-sol de la cathédrale de Trois-Rivières du 5 au 6 mars 2024. C’est à l’occasion du 30eanniversaire de Mission Chez Nous. Mission chez nous est une œuvre de l’Assemblée des évêques catholiques du Québec fondée en 1993.

At Saint-Paul University in Ottawa, a new dialogue circle focusing on coexistence has seen the light of the day. It was a beautiful day, almost like every other one, except that a new down was birthing for a dialogue circle on coexistence. The group includes students, professors, and workers who believe diversity is beautiful and a valuable aspect of coexistence.

Kwanzaa's fourth principle is Ujamaa, which emphasizes the importance of cooperative economics. It encourages us to work together to establish and sustain our own businesses, stores, and shops and to share the profits equitably. This principle is a cornerstone of our community's efforts to promote economic empowerment and self-sufficiency. On this fourth day, I want to reflect on one of my childhood memories that express the adage of my people: “ngwụzo ọrụ so n'ọrụ..” those accompanying the labourers are part of the labourers. 

On the second day of Kwanzaa, we celebrate the principle of Ujima, which means "Collective Work and Responsibility" in Swahili. This principle emphasizes the importance of working together as a community and taking shared responsibility for the well-being of each other. The principle of Ujima is based on the idea that we are all connected, and by working together, we can build and maintain a stronger and healthier community. It encourages us to collaborate and solve common problems in a way that benefits everyone.

Ziad K. Abdrlnour's saying is a great conversation starter for exploring the Second Kwanzaa principle, Kujichagulia. Ziad says, “For those who understand, no explanation is needed. For those who do not understand, no explanation is possible.” However, when it comes to Kwanzaa, it's not about whether an explanation is possible, but rather about the need for one. This is even interesting on this second day of Kwanzaa when we celebrate the self-determination of black people. For those who haven't experienced Kwanzaa, it's a beautiful annual celebration from December 26th to January 1st. During this time, black families, communities, and allies, mainly in the Americas, reflect on their rich past, present, and future histories and celebrate the vibrant and diverse Pan-African cultural and spiritual heritages. This week-long celebration is a chance to celebrate the dynamic and diverse Pan-African cultural and spiritual heritages and to rediscover their roots.

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